Romans 10:9-13
– Many people teach that all one has to do to be saved is to “Call on the name of the Lord.”
– This is neglectful of other scriptures that would contradict this teaching. (Acts 2:38, I Peter 3:21)
– Is taken out of context.

Context
– The Jews believe that in order for a Gentile to be saved, they’d first have to convert to Judaism, and then they could become Christians.
– Paul is writing this section of scripture to address who can be saved, not what has to be done to be saved. (Romans 10:12)

Contradiction
– Paul would not contradict his own words just a few chapters earlier.
– He taught that one must be baptized to participate in Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection, and into a new life!
– Also, Paul would not contradict his own experience. He called on the name of the Lord at his baptism. (Acts 22:16)

Calling
– The phrase “Calling on the name of the Lord” is not talking about literally calling on God’s name. It is an idiom. (“Idiom” = an expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meanings of its constituent elements. ย ie. “Grandma kicked the bucket” means “Grandma passed away.”)
– People were “Calling on the name of the Lord” in the Old Testament. (Genesis 4:26; 12:8; 13:4; 21:33; 26:25) None of these people knew Jesus — as He did not come yet. Therefore, this phrase cannot be used to justify the practice of praying Jesus into your heart or accepting Jesus into your heart.

Conclusion:
– Paul is talking about who can be saved not what has to be done to be saved.
– “Calling on the name of the Lord” is an idiom to describe one coming into a relationship with God. This happens nowadays through faith, repentance, and baptism!

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